Changing AC compressor 1992 4runner - YotaTech Forums

Go Back  YotaTech Forums > Toyota SUV & Truck Tech > 86-95 Trucks & 4Runners
Reload this Page >

Changing AC compressor 1992 4runner

Notices
86-95 Trucks & 4Runners 2nd/3rd gen pickups, and 1st/2nd gen 4Runners with IFS

Changing AC compressor 1992 4runner

Reply

Old 05-12-2018, 01:40 PM
  #1  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Changing AC compressor 1992 4runner

Hello there! I just bought a 1992 4runner SR5 with a little over 367,000 miles on it as a project, and living out here in AZ, air conditioning is a must. The AC didnt work when I bought it, so we started diagnosing the problem and it looks like the compressor clutch is bad. It has already been converted to r134a. I am going to change the compressor and receiver dryer, but I was wondering is there anything else I need to change? Also, would a Denso compressor be the best bet or could/should I go aftermarket? Thanks in advance!
Eli Singh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2018, 03:13 AM
  #2  
Registered User
iTrader: (1)
 
wyoming9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: I live in New Tripoli Pa out in the woods
Posts: 13,104
Thanks: 0
Thanked 19 Times in 19 Posts
Red face

Why change the compressor if it is only the clutch unless you want to..

How did you figure it was the clutch ??

Does the system hold vacuum??
wyoming9 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2018, 08:37 AM
  #3  
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco East Bay
Posts: 6,166
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Here's everything I know about A/C: https://www.yotatech.com/forums/f116...-r134a-284801/

The clutch CAN be replaced separately, which I would guess is a much simpler task than replacing the whole compressor.
scope103 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 12:51 AM
  #4  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
From all the research Iíve done doing the clutch will actually be a harder job, I went ahead and got a new compressor, receiver drier, expansion valve, and some o rings and gaskets, since the r134a conversion has already been done I donít need those parts. Since I just bought the car I am going to just fix up every piece as well as I can, and replace as much as I can afford 😅 the parts come in in a couple days, Iíll post how the swap goes on this thread by the end of next weekend!
Eli Singh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 01:02 AM
  #5  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
also scope, is there a difference in types of O rings? I ordered a set off rock auto, but Iím now wondering if they are different with a r134 converted system
Eli Singh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 01:38 AM
  #6  
Registered User
iTrader: (1)
 
wyoming9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: I live in New Tripoli Pa out in the woods
Posts: 13,104
Thanks: 0
Thanked 19 Times in 19 Posts
Red face

I can change a AC compressor clutch in about 30 minutes

I hope your new compressor comes with the clutch some do some don`t .

If you can swap a compressor that fast you are my new Hero

No doubt working in a Auto Shop that only does AC work

So to my Question does your system hold a vacuum??

Last edited by wyoming9; 05-14-2018 at 01:40 AM.
wyoming9 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 07:03 AM
  #7  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The system doesnít hold a vacuum for long, so weíre also going to look for the leaks after we slap the new compressor on. Should I have gotten just the clutch? I can always return it, if the clutch really is an easier job I will definitely go that route
Eli Singh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 09:27 AM
  #8  
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco East Bay
Posts: 6,166
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Eli Singh View Post
..., since the r134a conversion has already been done I donít need those parts. ..
What are "those parts"? At one time, it was believed that the R134a lubricant (PAG 45) was incompatible with the o-rings used with mineral oil. So it was often recommended to change all the o-rings. But since you're replacing all the o-rings (all of them, right?), you don't care (since you can't sell a vehicle car with R12 for the past 24 years, I can't imagine how you could even find the "wrong" o-rings for R134a.)

How do you plan to look for your leak? Releasing any refrigerant into the air will, eventually, kill us all.

Here's the manual for changing the A/C Compressor Clutch. http://web.archive.org/web/201102052...12compress.pdf And, guess what, it includes the diagnostics so that you can tell IN ADVANCE if changing the clutch is what you should do.
scope103 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 09:33 AM
  #9  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Scope thank you for the advice! Iíll definitely check out that manual, I got it diagnosed at a shop by my best friend who is a Porsche mechanic and his boss, they said that it doesnít hold vacuum and that the clutch isnít engaging, but it is getting power so they said go ahead and change the whole compressor and the rest of the system. The AC here in AZ is a must so I really wanna get it done as soon as possible haha. I will be able to see more in depth on Wednesday when the parts come in if they are the right ones
Eli Singh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 12:21 PM
  #10  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Also do you think I should go ahead and change the thermal expansion valve? Or just the clutch and receiver drier?
Eli Singh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 12:47 PM
  #11  
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco East Bay
Posts: 6,166
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Well, you do have a diagnostics problem. You know the clutch isn't closing with power applied, but that's all you know. When you replace the clutch, you might find the compressor is frozen, or just not pumping. You DO know that the system won't hold a vacuum, but you don't (I presume) know where. If it's in the cooling unit (condensor), you're going to have to pull that out, and with it out you definitely will replace the TXV. As I noted, the warranty on your new compressor is almost certainly no good if you DON'T replace the TXV (and flush the system).

If it were mine (and I didn't have the advice of a top-notch Porsche mechanic), I'd first pressurize the system with air to find the leak. Then you'll know (more about) which parts need to be replaced. What I wouldn't do is charge the system with R134a with the plan to just let it squeech out into the atmosphere as a substitute.
scope103 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2018, 12:00 AM
  #12  
Registered User
 
mholme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 113
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You're dealing with a 26 year old vehicle with unknown history of the AC system. It failed for a reason and you don't know what it pushed, pulled, sucked into every component. You also don't know what, if any oil is left in the compressor, so you need to pull it anyway. Even with a new compressor, you need to verify how much oil is in it. My new DENSO compressor came with about half of the specified oil charge.

If it were me, and it was not too long ago, I'd want to make sure everything is clean, debris and leak free before trying to make it cool. Most of the R134a "conversions" were and are, nothing more than putting fittings on the service ports of R12 hoses to make them take a charge with newer service equipment. So without knowing the history of the system other than that the compressor clutch doesn't engage and it doesn't hold vacuum, be prepared to do more than just replace the compressor/clutch, drier, o-rings and TXV. You may need new or rebuilt hoses too. I did, even though I bought used hoses off a vehicle that had already been converted. Remember that these conversions were being done decades ago and hoses don't last forever, especially with a gas they weren't designed for.

And scope103 is right about the warranty on a new compressor. You have to show proof of flushing the system and replacing the TXV in the evaporator box for them to honor a failed compressor. So just do it once and do it right. It's not that hard to get these systems working well.
mholme is online now  
Reply With Quote
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Maximus924
86-95 Trucks & 4Runners
13
04-05-2016 11:46 PM
astynx
86-95 Trucks & 4Runners
0
06-01-2013 03:28 PM
JohnRaven
The Classifieds GraveYard
21
01-31-2013 06:38 AM
richard212
84-85 Trucks & 4Runners
1
10-11-2011 07:55 AM
Kiff
86-95 Trucks & 4Runners
13
08-15-2007 05:59 PM


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Changing AC compressor 1992 4runner


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: