Notices
86-95 Trucks & 4Runners 2nd/3rd gen pickups, and 1st/2nd gen 4Runners with IFS

Re-wiring truck

Old 12-18-2018, 06:41 PM
  #1  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 102
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Re-wiring truck

Hey everyone, I'm in the middle of doing a rebuild on one of my Pickups and while I have the motor out I figured I'd re-wire everything under the hood because when I pulled the motor I noticed a lot of my wires/connectors were very brittle and corroded. Anyone got any pointers for me on how to go about doing this? Any info on where I can possibly just get a whole new wire harness with injector plugs, tps plugs etc?
Cumminsguy1 is offline  
Old 12-18-2018, 07:27 PM
  #2  
Registered User
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: sammamish, wa.
Posts: 2,038
Likes: 0
Received 27 Likes on 26 Posts
Painless Wiring should be able to hook you up. But its going to hurt a bit.
thefishguy77 is offline  
Old 12-18-2018, 09:20 PM
  #3  
Registered User
 
Genera_lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Austin, Tx
Posts: 87
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Originally Posted by thefishguy77 View Post
Painless Wiring should be able to hook you up. But its going to hurt a bit.
hopefully pun intended...
Genera_lee is offline  
Old 12-19-2018, 01:36 AM
  #4  
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 425
Received 44 Likes on 40 Posts
Toyota sells them for a gazzillion dollars.
I would replace the injector wiring and be done with it
ev13wt is offline  
Old 12-19-2018, 06:48 AM
  #5  
Registered User
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: sammamish, wa.
Posts: 2,038
Likes: 0
Received 27 Likes on 26 Posts
Originally Posted by Genera_lee
hopefully pun intended...
Nope. The last time I priced something through them it was around $700.
thefishguy77 is offline  
Old 12-19-2018, 08:17 AM
  #6  
Registered User
 
NYHumpinUtah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Enoch Utah
Posts: 726
Received 23 Likes on 22 Posts
Check out actfixer here on the forum he might build you one.
NYHumpinUtah is offline  
Old 12-19-2018, 08:28 AM
  #7  
Registered User
iTrader: (2)
 
se7enine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Reno , Nevada
Posts: 532
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 11 Posts
I would just cut and replace the needed wires. Solder and re-crimp with new terminals. All the wire and terminals/connectors can be had pretty cheap online. Even if you have to buy a crimp tool and solder gun it would still be pretty cheap compared to Painless or Toyota replacement.
se7enine is offline  
Old 12-19-2018, 09:07 PM
  #8  
Registered User
 
RAD4Runner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 5,903
Received 90 Likes on 74 Posts
Originally Posted by se7enine View Post
I would just cut and replace the needed wires. ...
+1

Originally Posted by ev13wt View Post
...I would replace the injector wiring and be done with it
Yes,
These crimps often break when engine is pulled or when harness are stressed.



RAD4Runner is offline  
Old 12-20-2018, 04:56 AM
  #9  
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 102
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Thanks guys I think I'll just cut and splice as you said, after pricing some wire harnesses from painless there is no way in hell I'll be spending $600 on something like this haha
Cumminsguy1 is offline  
Old 12-20-2018, 05:13 AM
  #10  
Registered User
 
RAD4Runner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 5,903
Received 90 Likes on 74 Posts
I prefer to twist splices securely, solder then heat shrink. I have both a 30watt and 80watt soldering iron. Wud like to invest in Dremel butane tool someday. Great for soldering or rope cutting when there's no electric power like in the field.

Last edited by RAD4Runner; 12-20-2018 at 05:16 AM.
RAD4Runner is offline  
Old 12-20-2018, 06:43 AM
  #11  
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco East Bay
Posts: 6,644
Likes: 0
Received 115 Likes on 102 Posts
The injector clips are the most fragile (the plastic locking tab will break, probably due to 25 years of exposure to heat). I recommend that instead of chopping up wires, you replace the part that broke.
Amazon Amazon
I de-pinned the old connecctor bodies, cut off the old pins at the wire crimp, and installed the new pins. It shortens the wire, but only by about 1-2mm, which doesn't matter.

You can get these connectors with "pigtails" already installed, but then you will end up with 12 new crimps and heat-shrink where you once had wire.

Just so you know, soldering is not enough; solder is not mechanically strong. The rest of your harness is only crimped, no solder at all, and it's lasted for 25 years.
scope103 is online now  
The following users liked this post:
RAD4Runner (12-20-2018)
Old 12-20-2018, 10:54 AM
  #12  
RJR
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern Colorado
Posts: 1,667
Likes: 0
Received 25 Likes on 22 Posts
Both crimping and soldering are quite reliable when properly done. Both make a gas-tight (important to maintain electrical integrity) connection that is mechanically quite strong. Note that the only thing holding the connectors and components on the surface-mount ECU board in your truck is solder.

The "properly done" is the issue. Crimps must be done with the proper tool that matches the connector and wire size. No squashing the crimp with pliers and hoping it will hold. By the same token, those blue and red cylindrical crimp connectors you can buy at Walmart are NOT the best way to splice wires for long-term reliability. Crimps are better in the engine compartment where temperatures are high and solder can begin to lose a significant percentage of its strength. But, the primary reason manufacturers use crimps over solder is that crimping is more amenable to high speed automation.

For a solder connection to be reliable, the metals to be joined must be bright and shiny. This can be a problem on old wiring where corrosion has often crept up into the insulation for several inches from the end of the wire, so even if you strip a new end, the wire strands can have dull surfaces that won't bond well to solder. Clean the wires well and then twist them together to maximize bonding area. It's also important to use a big enough iron that can thoroughly heat the joint quickly so that solder flows throughout the joint and bonds everywhere. Heat the joint and let the wire melt the solder - don't drip molten solder onto the joint. Finally, for vehicle work, leaded solder will give you better results. Leaded solder is completely legal in the US for electrical work and is readily available from supply houses. Any solder already in your second gen 4runner is leaded - the automotive industry didn't go ROHS until around 2014. Lead-free solder has problems with brittleness and doesn't handle thermal cycling or vibration nearly as well as leaded, as many laptop owners have found out when their display or processor board quits working due to a cracked surface-mount solder ball. For the same reason, military and space applications still spec leaded solder.
RJR is offline  
The following 2 users liked this post by RJR:
old87yota (12-20-2018), RAD4Runner (12-20-2018)
Old 12-20-2018, 12:28 PM
  #13  
Registered User
 
RAD4Runner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 5,903
Received 90 Likes on 74 Posts
Originally Posted by RJR View Post
Both crimping and soldering are quite reliable when properly done. Both make a gas-tight (important to maintain electrical integrity) connection that is mechanically quite strong.
+1 in my book.

hose blue and red cylindrical crimp connectors you can buy at Walmart are NOT the best way to splice wires for long-term reliability. ...
aka "butt" connectors for good reason

I like to parallel crimp then solder to fill in voids and increase contact area and corrosion-resistance, especially if near the battery. When I could not find the right-size parallel crimp...
RAD4Runner is offline  
Old 12-20-2018, 04:02 PM
  #14  
Registered User
 
old87yota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Portland, Oregon, USA
Posts: 2,044
Received 127 Likes on 117 Posts
Originally Posted by RJR View Post
The "properly done" is the issue. Crimps must be done with the proper tool that matches the connector and wire size. No squashing the crimp with pliers and hoping it will hold. By the same token, those blue and red cylindrical crimp connectors you can buy at Walmart are NOT the best way to splice wires for long-term reliability.
Exactly this ^^.

If you are set on using butt style connectors, the only ones I will use are the ones with heat shrink and adhesive built in (not the hard plastic, brightly colored ones), of course using the correct crimping tool.

old87yota is online now  
Old 12-20-2018, 05:36 PM
  #15  
Registered User
iTrader: (2)
 
se7enine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Reno , Nevada
Posts: 532
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 11 Posts
I get a lot of stuff from here
https://theelectricaldepot.com/
se7enine is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
zerokelvin
Newbie Tech Section
14
07-02-2018 08:37 PM
yamahabanshee350
General Electrical & Lighting Related Topics
3
12-09-2011 06:40 PM
rvsmichael
Ozarks
6
01-09-2009 08:14 PM
Dailydriver2
General Electrical & Lighting Related Topics
3
12-16-2005 04:12 PM
Vinman
95.5-2004 Tacomas & 96-2002 4Runners
6
11-01-2005 12:13 PM


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Re-wiring truck


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: