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blown motor?

Old 03-29-2017, 11:33 AM
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Update:
I tried again to moved the crankshaft pulley bolt counterclockwise with a little more pressure using the socket wrench with 3/4 inch socket. This time the crankshaft pulley bolt came loose!! So I was abled to removed the bolt without using a breaker bar.
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Old 03-29-2017, 11:43 AM
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atcfixer, thanks for your last comment. I will go ahead and follow through your last advice. I am still working on it.
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Old 04-01-2017, 05:01 PM
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Update

Update:
After I removed the valve cover, various wiring, rubber vacuum lines, etc., fan cover, fan, radiator. etc., I was abled to removed the crankshaft pulley turning to the counterclockwise without a breaker bar to hold against the movement of the pulley as mentioned earlier in my last post.

I removed the water coolant from the radiator and has this mixture color pour inside a cut up milk jug. Does it look like mixture of anti freeze and oil in there? Also, I removed oil from the oil pan and poured in the black container. Very strange color streak on top of the oil. Does that mean water and/or antifreeze are in there also? In addition, pictures of the inside valve cover chain trying to see if the valve guides are there. See the pictures below:

I also checked the timing chain on top of the gear chain and there is no play either, very tight. I cannot see this timing chain guide as per checking by atcfixer.

The piston can hit the valves, that is a possibility. If that is the case, then the motor can be rebuild or replace, right?

I then checked for any sign of engine block crack on the driver's side and so far, I did not see any.

From what I gathered so far, it appears the motor is dead and gone. I hope I am wrong.

What are my options at this point?

Replace the short block and/or long block? Cylinder head replacement? What parts on the motor can I save for using again? Do I need to replace pistons, rod, rocker arms, etc. oil pump, water pump? What about an engine rebuilt kit as advertise on Ebay? Does the engine rebuilt kit covers everything to make the motor run again?

Is the starter motor gear stuck from turning the crankshaft? Is the starter motor bad?

From the looks of it all, it appears that I need a full engine replacement.

Sorry about asking a lot of questions here. I just have to do more research and find out what exactly do I need to do and what replacements parts is require to make the motor running again without spending unnecessary money for parts that I don't need.

By the way, the 2 ton Capacity Foldable Shop Crane and 2 Ton Capacity Heavy Duty Load Leveler arrived. Just in time, right?
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Old 04-01-2017, 08:50 PM
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Your eyes can see better than what the camera will ever show. But of what I can see, looks like the timing chain guides are fine (it's the black plastic that the chains are against in the photos). I've seen them cracked in the middle before, but most crack up at the top bolt of what I've seen.

Antifreeze is normal kind of, just looks old and someone used green antifreeze I think. The brown color is most likely from rust. Flushing the whole cooling system with distilled water and putting in new fresh fluid will be a highly advised thing to do if/when you have the engine problem figured out.

Oil does seem quite light brown mixed with some dark oil. In my mind it might be antifreeze in the oil. You probably didn't think of it, but was the fluid level high which indicates extra came from somewhere? If it is antifreeze, that's not good news for the engine bearings (crank, cam, rods, etc).

Can't really say exactly what you need till we find what is locking up the engine. I'm hoping it isn't, but could be a broken rod. Depending on the damage it might be savable. If it's the valves, typically "rebuilding" the head with new valves, guides etc can get it up and going again unless the pistons got cracked/broken.

As far as rings go, it really depends how much you want to sink into the engine. A complete rebuild done "right" will be fairly expensive for all the bearings and such. That's why the long blocks on ebay are expensive. A complete used engine should be several times cheaper, and if you can install it then that saves some too. The down side of buying a used engine, is first you don't know the history of it, and second you'll most likely have to perform the maintenance items on it right away (timing chain, rear main seal, valve cover gasket, and anything else that's hard to get to with the engine installed but is fairly cheap to buy the parts. Of course with the long block, it's about the same story, but you need to install the parts rather than replace (everything on it should be good to go).

Next step in my head is either pull the cross member from under the engine, and the oil pan to inspect the bottom end for a broken rod, or take the head off to check for valves hitting etc. Head is probably the one I'd go for first with hopes it's in the top end. There's a suggested removal process for the bolts, I think it starts with the center 2 and works it way out to release tension on the valves w\o messing up the rocker arm assembly. Personally, I loosen a little at a time if there's valves pushed open. Talking about that, you could try to wiggle each of the rocker arms up and down to see if any have excess slop (stuck open valve), but you'd be probably pulling the head either way.


I probably should mention, I've never professionally worked on cars, what I know is just from experience and observing. My dad used to professionally work on cars, so I've been around the stuff quite a bit and have a fair idea on how to do things correct, but I'm not perfect by any means.
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Old 04-09-2017, 11:11 AM
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update:

I finally removed the timing chain cover. It was a little tricky removing all the bolts on the timing chain cover. I thought I had removed all the bolts and I tapped with a strong force using the hammer against the water pump pipe and nothing bulged. It turns out two remaining bolts were still on, especially the top bolt inside the cam spocket connecting to the gears of the distributor where there was a little puddle of oil hidden the bolt in view. After removing the timing cover, I then removed the chain, two plastic timing guides, chain tensioner, gears, distributor, etc., and inspected them all. No signs of wear, tear, cracked on all of them. Should I use all of them again or need to be replace? Also, It looks like the timing cover gasket is torn, wear out, etc., and needs to be replace. See the pictures below. Because I hit the timing cover with such force, would I need to replace the timing cover with a new one, due to possibly bent timing cover after I hit the water pipe with a hammer?


After removing the oil pan front two bolts under the timing cover, at first, the timing cover was not abled to moved, due to unsuspecting remaining two bolts that were still on the timing cover as described earlier above. So I removed all bolts on the oil pan and noticed metal shavings/slivers on the top of the oil pan and inside as well and its surrounding areas near the holes of the bolts removed. I also noticed the oil pan gasket was missing as well. That tells me, I believed, something is not turning the engine over at all while turning the crankshaft using a pulley to turn clockwise or counterwise. Pistons and/or rod bents inside the engine block? What about the overhead cam? Could it be the overhead cam (head) is bent out of shape along with the rockers? If that is the case, then the engine block should be fine and the overhead cam (head) just need to be replace? What is the best and easy way to remove the oil pan? Once the oil pan is removed, should I check under the engine block to see if the pistons/rods are ok or not? If not, what to look for to make sure that the engine short block needs to be replace or replace the pistons/rods? In order to completely remove the oil pan, some say remove the sway bar, others say remove the motor mounts. Even leave the oil pan laying on the bar when removing the engine (if that is the case) using the cherry picker. See pictures below again.

I am tempted to buy a used engine short block that is for sale of $120 at a salvage yard. How would I know if the used short block is good? What to inspect? Cylinder heads, pistons/rods? Do I bring my removable crankshaft pulley with me and put it on the short block and turn it clockwise or counterwise? If short block crankshaft does turn, then it means ok to buy it? What about getting a used overhead cam (head) as well?

Someone mentioned that the head is possibly cracked and needs to be replace and the short block is rarely cracked.

Next step is to remove the overhead cam (head). Comments, anyone?
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Old 04-13-2017, 04:20 PM
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22re engine rebuilt manual?

I am tempting to rebuild the engine myself after removing the engine from the truck. After researching on the internet on remanufactured motors, rebuilt motors, among core and shipping charges, I could save a lot of money if I do the engine rebuilding myself. In addition, I also searched for a manual for this particular toyota motor rebuilt, providing step by step process and the proper tools to use with. Along with specific parts to look for replacements. I want to do this engine rebuilding myself and I would like to have a manual that specifically addressed to the engine rebuilding process. I searched and found out very little information out there. However, the FSM (Factory Service Manual) is somewhat limited in its scope. Does anyone out there can point me to the right direction in getting this specific manual?
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Old 04-18-2017, 03:27 PM
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Update on rebuilt/remanufactured 22re long block engine

Update:

First, I want to apologize to all for the lengthly delay in not responding sooner in terms of my progress on the issue of the 22re engine situation.

I have been doing quite a lot of brainstorming and researching in regards to having my old 22re long block engine rebuild by using/having a machine shop or purchasing a rebuilt/remanufactured 22re long block engine. It was a nerve-whacking experience. Boy, I am getting an education here. My concerns are the unknowns out there and due to my very limited/little experience in this type of situation. I also have been debating myself weighing the pros and cons of these two options (rebuilding the old 22re long block engine through a machine shop or/vs buying a rebuilt/remanufactured 22re long block engine). The nearest machine shop from my area/location (50 miles) can do the rebuilding on my old 22re wanted $1600 to do the job (parts and labor). Other machine shops further away wanted $2100 or so) Considering everything about sending the 22re engine for rebuilding, (also my time, gas money, driving distance/time) including loading up the engine in my station wagon with the possibility of hurting myself and doing damage to my wagon and all the necessary things I have to do to make it work. Also, not knowing what old parts on the old engine will stay on, I am afraid the machine shop will cut corners on rebuilding my 22re engine to make more money off of me. This is my gut feeling telling me that. Not knowing what old parts stays on and new parts put in the old engine makes me uneasy. If so, that would diminish the quality of the work perform and the engine rebuild will end up less than the good quality of the engine should be.

A lot of rebuilt/remanufactured 22re engines on ebay and elsewhere are rather pricey anywhere from $1600 to $4000, just the long block engine alone!! That is not including core charges which range from $400 and up as well as freight/shipping charges in addition to purchasing the 22re engine. The old adage "You get what you paid for" still rings true to this day.

I wanted to keep and have the 1992 Toyota pickup running for another 10 years or so.

After reviewing all my options, as well as pros and cons, today, I went ahead and purchase a remanufactured long block 22re engine for the total amount of $1150 (that includes delivery/freight charges to my home) with a 2 year warranty on the long block engine with no core charge. The core will return back to the company as soon the rebuilt/remanufactured engine arrive at my home. The return shipping charges/fee on the core will be paid by the company (good thing I don't have to pay return shipping charges). I have done some research on the company looking for flaws. In addition, I also checked the BBB (Better Business Bureau) for any kind of bad information, reviews or red flags on the company that would change my mind in buying the rebuilt 22re from that company in the first place. So far, the company appears to be in good standing.

I hope I made the right decision in purchasing the rebuilt/remanufactured long block engine from that company in terms of price and hopefully, good quality of the long block engine.

While I am waiting for the rebuilt long block engine to arrive at my home ( about two weeks time from now), I would like to know if I need any replacement parts, particular if I should replace the older timing cover that I banged earlier to remove it or if the new timing cover is included on the rebuilt engine. Perhaps I should wait until I get the rebuilt engine to arrive and to determine what additional parts I need from there on. Any comments/feedback/advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks for reading.
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Old 04-18-2017, 04:40 PM
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Post a link to the long block you bought. That will help us answer your questions more accurately. You are going to need some gaskets I'm sure. You might try searching for a long block gasket kit. Was the long block described as dressed? That would mean that it has the chain installed and timed. Many of the long blocks come with a gasket kit but make sure the gaskets are high quality and not just the cheapos they spend $5 on just to say that it comes with gaskets. I know you are going to need an oil pan gasket and valve cover gasket plus the gaskets for your intake, throttle body etc.
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Old 04-18-2017, 05:03 PM
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Charchee Thanks for responding. Here is the link where I bought the engine:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Toyota-22r-2...p2047675.l2557
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Old 04-18-2017, 05:08 PM
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Also, I kind of knew I need some new gaskets, such as oil pan gasket, intake manifold gasket, possibly timing chain cover gaskets, etc. Possibly thermastat housing gasket as well as other kinds of gaskets that I am not aware of. I also notice on ebay, there are several types and kinds of engine rebuilt kits, gaskets, etc. The trick is finding the correct and right kind of parts that I need to make the motor complete. Any comments on that, too?
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Old 04-23-2017, 08:21 AM
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Finally got the motor out with pictures!!!

Yesterday, we (my friend, who is a very good mechanic and knows his stuff) and I finally got the engine out. There is no way I could have done it myself alone, not knowing exactly what the totality of the process in removing the engine. There were two bolts on the back of the engine that was giving us trouble trying to separate the transmission bell, even though we got all the bolts removed. I forgot what they are called. One bolt on each side of the rear engine. Anyway, the bottom line is we got the engine out. See the pictures below.

We went over the engine to inspect and why the motor was not turning over. Our best guess was the engine had internal damage and being old. We both agreed that I made the right decision to replace the motor and not having the engine rebuild. In addition, I was told by the machine shop owner that the engine must be rebuildable itself, otherwise just replace with a rebuilt/remanufactured motor. Also, there were a lot of metal shavings inside the oil pan.

Afterwards, we both inspected most, if not all, the belt, electrical connections, hoses, rubber vacuum lines, distributor, bolts, screws, etc. All appears to be in good condition. Some parts are ok but at the same time, I was advised to replace certain parts, even though the parts are in good working condition, especially the clutch pressure plate, throw out bearing,and the pressure plate. (clutch kit). Sooner or later, some parts will eventually wear out over time and it is best to replace them now while the motor is out. We came up with a to do list:

Things to get taken care when putting new/rebuilt motor in toyota pickup:

Engine Gasket kit

12mm intake manifold bolts replacement.

Pressure plate, throw-out bearing, and clutch pressure plate replacements. Another name for clutch kit?

Clean the radiator and have it flush.

Clean alternator and starter motor.

Clean up the inside the hood area using oven cleaner (same stuff that use engine degreaser, I think) and use hot water pressure washer to rinse out.

New spark plugs.

new fuel filter

motor oil

anti freeze

Clean oil pan.

Replace thermastat and its gasket.

take certain parts off the old motor and put on new/rebuilt motor. Clean them up.

Clean valve cover inside and out.

Clean out old gaskets and replace with new gaskets on parts, intake manifold, water pump, timing cover, etc.

Clean old parts that goes on the rebuilt/engine including the oil pan.

All rubber hoses, vacuum hoses, electrical connectors, belt, are good.

Distributor, spark plugs wires are good.

I think the to do list is pretty much cover the things for me to do while I am waiting for the rebuilt/remanufacture motor to arrive. Thanks for all who helped me guide through this process of removing the engine. Comments, anyone?
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Old 04-27-2017, 08:50 PM
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Sounds like when the engine arrives, they expect you to give the core up right away for the return shipping. I'd pull everything but what the core has as photoed. All electronics (knock sensor etc), oil pan, oil pickup and such. Since you're removing the oil pan, you could look inside the engine and most likely find why it doesn't turn over, should be pretty easy to spot, unless it seized from lack of oil (water in oil etc), but it shouldn't spin at all in that case. Don't forget to grab your flywheel unless you're replacing it too. I see some brackets and such on the block you'd want to pull as well (alternator brackest and the tubing are the two big ones I see, and the intake support bracket).

Generally it's a good idea to replace the wearable clutch parts since it is easy to do right now, and the fact that you're spending the money now, you probably don't want to have to drop the trans in a few months to do the clutch if it happens to wear out in that time. Since it's a reman engine, timing kit, soft plugs, and main seals should be new, so only thing that comes to mind is to replace the trans input shaft seal if you'd like the peace of mind of no leaks, same logic as the clutch kit.

Based on the ebay listing, it says "Push the Buy It Nowand get the Big Bore Kit Upgraded for Free !" so I assume they gave your the "big bore kit". Might be a good idea to make sure you have paperwork that states what all is oversized in the engine (piston size, bearing sizes etc) so if it ever does need work down the road, you know what it currently has. Depending on how the big bore is done, it could actually be a less desirable thing, but unlikely you'd be wanting to rebuild this engine in 10 or so years anyway. Basically if they bored out the engine as big as they could, if you ever need to rebuild again, the block cylinders can't be bored any further, and the block basically becomes junk. In the ATV world, you could just resleeve the cylinder, but not really possible on a cast iron block. Not a deal breaker or any thing, but could be why the engine is cheaper than others.

I'm not really on top of car engine rebuilds, but might want to check with the seller if it has standard pistons or high compression and if any port work was done to the heads. If the piston is oversized, some head work could help the flow, but I can't advise for this exact engine. In the ATV world over sized valves are pretty common when you're going "big bore", and port matching the intake. Head work alone can get very expensive very fast, so I'm guessing it's a OEM style head with standard sized valves. I know a guy that has over $3k into a 3.0L rebuild with new heads with oversized valves installed and such. Truck runs great but gets terrible MPG... like 13mpg at best for long trips, but it's a 4runner with an automatic trans.

Anyway, good luck with the engine swap. Be sure to follow a break in procedure once you get it all together. Generally "standard" oil or whatever you want to call it is used for the break in period, then after so many miles synthetic can be used if you desire. Generally it's accepted to take an easy on the engine, something like no more than half throttle for the first 500 miles (or whatever number), then 3/4 for the next like 2000 miles. Oil changes should be often at first since there will be excess metal wear from things mating together. I think first oil change is normally suggested around 500 miles.

I'd personally recheck the torque on the head bolts, main bearing caps, and piston rods. I've seen a couple engines that were claimed "rebuilt" and shortly after said rebuild the rod literately unbolted and came apart and when the crank came around, it hit the rod though the side of the block. There is a warranty, but I'm sure it isn't fun to actually use the warranty for something like that. I suspect there should be some sort of warranty paperwork with the engine, would want to check that before putting a socket to anything encase it states you can't touch head bolts etc or warranty is void.
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:14 AM
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atcfixer, thanks for your latest comments.
Update/followup with pictures and diagrams of short block and the cylinder head.

Sorry about the delay in following up on the blown motor issue. I was still waiting for the remanufactured engine to arrived at my home that I ordered on Ebay. The seller, for some unknown reason, backed out in selling me the engine. Long story short, I did not get the remanufactured engine, which is why the delay in writing in this post. I am still trying to resolve the motor issues and will see this through completely by updating my progress in this forum, even though it is taking a long time since my last post.

i was lucky to have a friend to come over and helped me removed parts of the motor bared down to separate short block and the overhead cam.(see pictures enclosed). I was told by him, a reasonable good mechanic, that he knows what is wrong but sometimes he does not fully explain to me what needs to be done to repair the engine with proper parts. I just need further clarification and understanding of the issues. Here is what he told me:

1. take cam and piston 1 to be tested for repair or replace. What exactly is a cam? Is it the head that goes on the short block? See the diagram enclosed.

2. Crank bearing destroyed causing the lock up, What parts are need for the cranking bearing replacement? See the diagram and show me what parts are need to be replace.

3. Checked the short block, so far the short block looks good inside and out. No cracks, wear and tear, either.

Inside the engine bore cylinder diameter is approximately 3 and 9/16 inches.

Also, the head cylinder overhead cam appears to be in good shape, including the arm rocker, valves, etc. Do I need to replace any parts at all on head cylinder overhead cam? Does the head needed to be "shaved" prior to reattach to the short block? What parts are need to be replace as indicated on the diagram I enclosed?

Due to financial constraints and limited knowledge/experience on working 22re engine, I would like to put the engine back together by myself. I believed I don't I need special tools unless I am mistaken. I had some limited help removing parts of the engine and so far, all parts that I looked at appears to be good. However, I am replacing several, if not many, parts to avoid potential problems in the near future so I won't have to take the engine apart again.

Radiator needs to be replace due to the coils/fins etc., if that is the correct word, outside sticking out after being water pressure tested. It was push back in and still works for a awhile longer, according to the radiator shop owner. However, he advised me to replace the whole radiator with a new replacement radiator since the old radiator is not repairable.

Clutch pressure plate, throw out bearing and clutch plate as part of the clutch kit should be replace even though, the parts are good for now. Eventually, they will wear out and it is better to replace the parts now while I am at because if and when they wear out, I have to take the engine out again. Don't want to do that.

Replace fuel filter

What about timing chain kit, even though all parts related to the timing chain are good? Would it be advisable to replace all the parts that are (tensioners, timing chain guide, spocket, etc.) in the timing chain kit?

Remember, I plan on having this pickup for, hopefully, another 10 years. So far, the approximate number of miles on the pickup is about 175,000 miles. In addition, I don't drive the pickup often and drive about once a week, less than 50 miles a month.

Would a engine rebuild kit be feasible even though most of the parts, if not all, are still good? What parts are necessary to replace without spending extra money on parts that I do not need based on the information above? If engine rebuild kit is advisable, what parts are needed in regards to my current engine situation?

What is the inside holes cylinder diameter size that would match the pistons replacement? The engine bore cylinder diameter is approximately 3 and 9/16 inches? I noticed there are several sizes piston heads that sells on ebay. How to determine what piston size is correct and needed to replace the piston, if necessary? Is there some kind of marking that shows the piston size on the piston? Should I get all four new pistons? Does the engine cylinder hole needs to be rebore for larger size piston, even though it looks good without any signs of scratches, markings, dents, cracks, etc., inside the 4 piston holes on the short block? Perhaps I am not making myself clear or making any sense. I often read that the short block needs to be "machined shop" Does my short block needs to be machined shop? What does that mean? Also, does the overhead cam needs to be machined shop as well? Need to be clarify this Machined Shop thing in relating to my short block, overhead cam issue.

I am enclosing the pictures/diagrams of the 22re engine and the head. Can anyone tell me what parts on the diagrams that needs to be replace based on the latest information in this post?

Also, I saw this Toyota pickup 22re engine repair guide on Ebay. Is it helpful as to step by step instructions in putting back together the engine and its parts correctly? Is it any good instruction manual? Here is the Link: http://www.ebay.com/itm/TOYOTA-22RE-...p2047675.l2557

Anything else do I need to know or to do on my end?

Any comments/advice/feedback is greatly appreciated. Thanks for reading. Stay tune.
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Old 05-18-2017, 12:13 PM
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To get to the meat of the matter, the failed bearing/bearings on the crank is what would worry me. Special tools are very highly advised insteadly of blindly guessing specs. I'm talking measuring in the thousands of an inch, no "abouts" when talking engine measurements. I'd guess bare minimum you will need the block crank bearing location bored larger, and also check the measurement on the crank bearing surfaces. If they are not consistent or out of standard spec, you'd need them "turned" or cut down to a standard value. You'd also need special oversized crank bearings. Never done this myself, but I'd think the machine shop would need the bearings to measure before doing the machine work.

Similar should be done for all wear surfaces of the engine, basically checking the measurements and making sure they are within the allowable specs. Since it was a bearing problem, I'd guess the piston/ring setup is probably usable yet but measuring is the only way to be sure. You'd also want to remove the rings off the pistons (very easy to break) and check the ring gap. The head should also be checked in a similar manner, things can look fine but be out of spec meaning it would likely have a shorter than "normal" life span or could even cause problems if not addressed.

The timing chain is a service part that is expected to be replaced every x miles. If you don't know when it was done, cheap insurance is to replace it and note date/mileage. Basically it's like a belt, you don't want to wait till the belt fails to replace it. Instead of being stuck on the side of the road and being a fairly cheap fix, you'd be stuck on the side of the road with an engine with likely major damage (interference engine design).

For the cam question, it's #10 in the first diagram. It's the part that opens and closes the valves to make the engine run. The timing chain turns the cam 1/2 the speed than that of the crank to create the 4 cycle process of intake, compression, spark/fire/explosion, exhaust.

It might be advisable to see if a local school would allow you to use their tools, or even have the students do the work for an automotive teaching class. You'd have to work the details out with the teacher, kids learning can make mistakes and such, but atleast there is someone there steering them though the whole process. I know there's atleast two schools in my area that does this. It's not a super complicated process, just needs precision and done properly. I'm not sure if there are any guides to walk though all the steps. I'm sure there's a college class that would cover engine building, but I'm sure that's longer and more money than what you'd want to invest.
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Old 05-18-2017, 01:10 PM
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atcfixer Thanks so much for your last post and your clarity of my concerns/issues of the motor. Your detailed explanation of the processes involving the engine makes it so much easier for me to understand.

Funny though, I did inquired automotive schools near my area, (the closest one is 70 miles from my home) about having my engine worked on. I found out that the state law was passed earlier this year indicating no outside vehicle repair work done on vehicles, except students, faculty, staff's and state workers's vehicles. Darn it, I just missed that!!

I am going to take the motor and head to a machine shop. Hopefully, the machinist will give me an estimate on the total repair built cost. I hope it would be cheaper now that I took the engine apart.

Normally, if the engine was already together by itself and drop off at the machine shop, the total repair/rebuilt cost would be around $1400, including parts needed.

It would be interesting to find out how much a total rebuild motor is going cost this time. Stay tune for the latest follow up.
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Old 05-23-2017, 10:05 AM
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Bare block to a machine shop

Update:

I finally was abled to go to a machine shop yesterday.

I took the short block along with the crankshaft, pistons, piston rods, rod bearings, main bearings, all removed, leaving a bare short block to a machine shop that was recommended.

The shop owner looked over the bare block and the parts that I removed as mentioned above. All pistons are good, just need cleaning.

Here is the breakdown of the services/repairs on the short block by the machine shop owner:

clean block
Hone block
grind Crank
Replace Rod (connecting rod on the crankshaft to the piston?)
Clean pistons
assemble short block
Rings (piston rings?) replacement
Rod Bearings replacement
Main Bearings replacement
Thrust Washers

I am very relieved due to the fact it was a short block issue. I could have bought a rebuild total engine as mentioned earlier in the previous threads on this post. By going this route of repairing the short block, it saves me a lot of money, unnecessary headaches/worries, hassles dealing with the shipping, shipping charges, return shipping of the core and core charges issues. In addition, to visit/see the actual machine shop in person so to know and what to expect in dealing with the machine shop and its owner, instead of some annonymous seller on ebay and elsewhere on the websites. Also, a lack of personal contact in dealing with motor issues as well.

One thing I did not do was to bring the head to the shop, since I thought it was a short block issue. What I want to know is the sohc (single overhead cam) or the head needed to be replace with a new one/rebuilt?. It seems the head is in good shape and does not need to be replace at all, just cleaning up. Valve clearance on the rocker arms are good. Any way or how to tell if the head is in good working order? What to look for in the head for defects, cracks, etc.? Once the short block is finish with the repair work as mentioned above, does the head needed to be "shaved" prior to attaching to the short block (with new head gasket)?

The time frame to know when will the short block will be finish is about 2 weeks' time from yesterday. I will continue to follow up on this issue in the forum (this post and its threads) right up to the end. Stay tune.
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Old 05-23-2017, 11:41 AM
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The head is fairly complicated. I'd talk to the shop owner and see what he suggests. I'm pretty sure a valve regrind/relap is pretty common when rebuilding an engine, check valve guide slop (the tube the valves spin in). Checking cam specs etc isn't a bad idea but that's more for performance instead of longevity based. The head needs to be checked very well for cracks, most common is between valve openings to spark plug hole, and between the valves. If all checks out well there, the other big test is to make sure the head is true/flat/square. Back in my small engines class we used a metal flat ruler and a feeler gauge to check for wear/warped blocks/heads, not sure if it's the same process for the engine block/head for cars, or if something more accurate is used now.

If the head passes the warp test, then you'd just want to find out what the oem head gasket thickness is when compressed vs the new head gasket thickness assuming it's aftermarket and not from a toyota dealership. Generally aftermarket is thicker, which boils down to a small loss in compression, to make up for the difference, it's fairly common to shave the head the same amount as how much thicker the new gasket is. Going a tiny bit more could give you higher compression, but if you go too far you have to run higher grade fuel and could have other issues surface.

Personally, I'd be more focused re-using your existing head as long as it doesn't have major issues. An aftermarket will likely not be as high quality as oem. You can really sink a lot of money into the head, but I'd assume you're not so worried about performance, but rather an engine that will run and hopefully not fail for the next 200k+ miles.

FYI, SOHC is just to denote the cam layout, the cam is still a cam rather it's in the block, as a SOHC, or DOHC configuration. I could be wrong, but I think valve clearance on the rocker arms should be measured when warm, but it's possible to have a cold spec too (larger gap than hot spec). Since the engine had bottom end issues, the top end (head/ cam etc) should be usable as-is but double checking things helps prevent problems down the road.

Another thing to note, generally it's advised to replace the head bolts whenever the head is removed. I'd check a service/shop manual to see what it mentions. I've re-used head bolts on my private vehicles and small engines and haven't had problems, but from my understanding problems are more likely when re-using them.

Just to cover a couple of the services mentioned by the shop.

Hone the block is basically a fancy word for re-surfacing the cylinder walls. This is done when the cylinders are within spec and re-usable in their current shape/bore size and matches the piston size
grind Crank - I'm assuming this is for the damage to the crank from the bad bearing, so the damage must not be too deep and the crank is re-usable, which is good news for your pockets. This might result in a need for an oversized bearing, but the shop should know best.
replace rod - yea it's the connecting rod crank to piston wrist pin, it would probably be the one that had the bearing issue
assemble short block - I'm glad to see this listed, assuming there is a warranty on the work, and this is kind of the key item that makes that possible. Besides that they should torque the bolts etc correctly
rings replacement - yea this would be the piston rings, should give you new spec compression if the top end is in good shape

I'm wondering how much the total bill will be. Bearings, a rod, rings, and thrust washers isn't bad for a parts list, so most of the cost will probably be labor.
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Old 05-23-2017, 12:10 PM
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atcfixer, Thanks for your invaluable insight into my issues of the short block. I appreciated it. I will have the head check out. Stay tune.
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Old 05-23-2017, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by atcfixer View Post
.... Back in my small engines class we used a metal flat ruler and a feeler gauge to check for wear/warped blocks/heads . ....
To check heads (or blocks) for warping you use a machined StraightEdge, not a ruler. http://web.archive.org/web/201211101.../7cylinder.pdf The spec is only .006", and you're not going to find a ruler that is THAT straight. But the shop will have one and know how to use it.

Originally Posted by atcfixer View Post
... Another thing to note, generally it's advised to replace the head bolts whenever the head is removed. I'd check a service/shop manual to see what it mentions. I've re-used head bolts on my private vehicles and small engines and haven't had problems, but from my understanding problems are more likely when re-using them. ....
Toyota has a Technical Service Bulletin advising that head bolts are re-usable. https://www.toyotaparts.metro-toyota...T-EG98-002.pdf Of course, that TSB was written before your truck got to 25 years old, so if it makes you feel better to replace the head bolts, they are only about $20 for a set. Keep in mind that this is a slippery slope; it's "better" to replace, well, everything. You decide where to stop.
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Old 05-23-2017, 01:12 PM
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We were working on Briggs & Stratton engines, so the tolerance was probably much bigger and it was the 90's, or the teacher just wasn't the best role model, he was in his late 60s or early 70s and probably was teaching more old school. He was also color blind which was interesting... he you in the red shirt.. or wait is that green?
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