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ARB vs Aussie locker front and rear?

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Old 12-02-2017, 10:11 AM   #1
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ARB vs Aussie locker front and rear?

Quick rundown is that my truck is used 95% of the time on road as a daily driver and is stock ride height, max tire size will be 31 x 10.5 for the foreseeable future. 5 spd 4WD 1988 DLX extended cab 22RE 4cyl non turbo.


I have a howling noise that I'm pretty sure is a pinion bearing and am getting close to putting a new differential in it to get better off road traction and hopefully fix my howling/wobbling issue.


There is a lot of good info out there about the ARB lockers and the aussie seems to be a decent alternative.

Would I be better off to put the aussie lockers in front and rear than an ARB air locker for a truck that is driven 95% of the time on road?

My plan is to do the rear differential now then add the front at a later date. Would I be better off using an ARB air locker in the rear and only locking when I go off road or an aussie and just let it do it's thing?


Same question for the front...am I better off using the aussie locker since the truck is used on road primarily?

It's just one of those things where it's about $1000 vs $2000+ depending on which route I go for front and rear all together...in the long run the $1000 isn't that much money but I just don't know if I will really see any advantage to the ARB air lockers when so much of the time I would be on road and could have just let the differential lock up on it's own without having to hit the switch.


Thanks for any advice,

Donnie
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Old 12-02-2017, 11:27 AM   #2
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If you have the money, the selectable lockers are better, hands down. Look into the Harrop E-lockers too.
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Old 12-02-2017, 11:43 AM   #3
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Thanks so much for the advice.

I'm just on the fence because I don't know how much advantage I will see by as opposed to running the aussie type locker in the rear and the full on air locker in the front.


Are the Harrop lockers as reliable as the ARB air types? How much more or less cost wise?

Thanks again,

Donnie
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Old 12-02-2017, 11:52 AM   #4
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The aussie type lockers are certainly much cheaper, but any locker that is engaged when used in ordinary street driving, or on ice and snow presents problems that are non existent with any locker that can be turned of and on with a switch.
Harrop lockers are a little more expensive than ARB, but there are no air compressor, air line, or air servo issues to deal with.
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Old 12-02-2017, 12:27 PM   #5
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Thanks so much, I'll look into the ARB/Eaton setups and hopefully this one gets me by until I can get the select able types
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Old 12-02-2017, 03:57 PM   #6
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I think it depends on the driver. I drove a Lock-Right for years in rear. Yes it has quarks are they learnable? Yes. Are they predictable? Yes. Do you have to pay attention more? Yes. In snow and ice simple put it in 4wd so front pulls too. So think about it like this. Driving a 5spd is like reading the newspaper, 9th grade level at most. Driving Lock-Right 5spd was like college level. And some ppl donít ever figure it out and hate them. But some ppl need backup cameras and side mirror sensors. Depends on you. BUT.... if youíre not the only person to drive truck got to factor that in.

Iíve run an ARB for years, theyíre nice but problematic at times especially when they sit unused. Iíve had pressure switch die; seals in carrier portion leak oil x2 which makes a mess when it blow out of solenoid when disengaging; pulled airline out in airline out in sub-freezing temps which required repairing in snow and ice.

now Iím just over 300 miles into break-in of a new dif with a Grizzly installed. Havenít offroaded it yet. But on road so smooth, quarks are less noticeable than Lock-Right. Iíve got an Aussie in front but never ran one in rear.

if I were you iíd Seriously consider re-gearing. As a dif last for years and years and re-gearing is spendy. Look for a used IFS dif to swap into front that is already re-geared and locked. Save a bit. You can run 33s on IFS with a few adjustments.
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Old 12-02-2017, 04:06 PM   #7
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I had front and rear aussies on my 81 Trekker, period daily driver for 8 years. Like muddpigg said it depends on the the driver
Lunchbox lockers have their quirks.
Upside to the lunch box lockers is that even I managed to install the lockers front and rear following write ups from Zuk's site http://gearinstalls.com/
so i had a fully locked truck for $500 where a 'real locker' could be $500++ for one diff plus install cost
If I had my choice and $3k i would order a set of drop in ARB 3rds from Marlin, East Coast Gear, Low Range etc
If you need the truck to drive on the road under ice/snow conditions get the ARB so you can turn it off and have open 4wd (at least up front). The fully locked front end of tends to pull straight even if you are turning

Do you really need a front locker?

Last edited by dropzone; 12-02-2017 at 04:08 PM.
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Old 12-02-2017, 08:59 PM   #8
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Note that if you put an Aussie or other automatic locker in the front, you'll want manual hubs if you don't already have them. That will keep the locker from doing its own thing when you're in 2wd on the highway.

Last edited by RJR; 12-02-2017 at 09:01 PM.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:36 AM   #9
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Thank you guys for the replies. A little more background on the vehicle and intended use. This is my daily driver, stock ride height pickup. It spends 95% of it's time driving back and forth to work or running errands. I am one of those people who likes to just do it once and do it right, throughout my years of restoring and fixing cars I've had to replace certain parts 3-4 times in order to finally get to a "fast enough" or "strong enough" part to fit my needs. My background is more in pro-touring/drag racing type cars/traction so the locker is a somewhat new idea as I've always run "posi" type limited slips in my street/strip cars.

I just want to be able to get as far as the truck can go if I ever needed it to up getting a Christmas tree in the snow or out on a back trail fishing with my son etc...

Right now it is completely stock and I'm open to the gears but really like to be able to cruise on the highway at 65 at 2600 or so RPM too.

I've found a couple of 3rd members here locally..I might go pick one up to build on the side.

It's just one of those things where I don't know if I'll ever really need the extra $500 worth of capability of the air or E type lockers as a opposed to the capability/driveability of the aussie type lockers. If it's really only $1000 more to go full air/ E lockers front and rear..I'll probably just do the rear then the front at a later date and skip the auto lockers. Although the quarks don't bother me as far as the clicking in parking lots or occasional rear end slide out in slick conditions...I just think that eventually i'll want the real lockers anyway.

Any opinions are much appreciated.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:55 AM   #10
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You don't say where you are (at least I didn't see it), and as to whether you plan to drive on snow/ice other than in the backcountry.

Because of your limited offroad needs, I would skip the Aussie in the rear. It will be a constant annoyance for most of your driving. In my mind, not worth it for the few times you'll actually need it, and it won't be your friend on slick highways, either.

That being said,
- If you never drive snow/ice except in the backcountry to get a Christmas tree, go snowshoeing, etc., an Aussie up front with manual hubs will serve you well. It will give you awesome offroad performance and be completely invisible on the highway once you unlock the hubs. That's pretty much my use model for my '94, and I'm happy with my choice.
- If you need to drive snow/ice in urban/high traffic environments where you want to be in 4wd on the street, get the switchable locker in the rear. The Aussie auto locker in the front is not all that friendly for street snow/ice use. I drive my '94 sometimes on snow/ice with the Aussie up front, but I much prefer the fulltime 4wd on the '06 for that kind of use.
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:10 AM   #11
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Thanks RJR,

That sounds like a really good option for me with the aussie up front. Then in that case, would you just leave the rear differential stock?


We live basically at sea level in Northern California. We ski maybe 5 times per year but have a couple of Subarus we can take for that as well

Thanks again,

Donnie
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:27 AM   #12
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I'd leave the rear diff open (stock). With one locker in the front, you'll be amazed at where that truck will go offroad. The front locker does make the steering heavier when in 4wd, but it's not bad. I'd rather sacrifice some trail manners vs having a rear Aussie clunking every time I turn a corner on the street.

The AWD Suburus are way better for skiing than any part time 4wd truck, unless the snow gets a foot deep on the highway.
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Old 12-06-2017, 11:30 AM   #13
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Thanks so much, that sounds like a good plan. I won't mind the heavier steering at all in 4WD
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Old 12-06-2017, 02:26 PM   #14
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I think RJR has a solid point. I donít think the money for an ARB in the rear is going to be worth the time you use it.
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Old 12-08-2017, 11:55 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uraceulose View Post
Thanks so much for the advice.

I'm just on the fence because I don't know how much advantage I will see by as opposed to running the aussie type locker in the rear and the full on air locker in the front.


Are the Harrop lockers as reliable as the ARB air types? How much more or less cost wise?

Thanks again,

Donnie
Hi Donnie-

The auto lockers, like the Aussie or the Spartan, are hard for some to get used to because of the quirks on the road. The quirks are even more noticeable with a manual tranny versus the auto tranny.
That's where the selectable locker shines.....nice, friendly onroad performance in "open spider gear mode"....and full lock/traction when the switch is thrown offroad. Best of both worlds.

Your 88 model has the 4 cylinder diff....a common 8" diff in the rear....and by the way, I can also rebuild your diff with new bearings(and add a locker in) if you decide that. A Harrop #9334 is available for yours.

Regarding the Harrop elocker .....The Harrop runs about 1295.00 and the ARB runs roughly 940.50.
The Harrop does not need an air compressor and the ARB absolutely does and that is purchased separately for about 300 smackaroos. So, with the compressor figured in, the price difference between the 2 is very small.

Both lockers are overbuilt and very strong internally.....But the Harrop is still considered an "upgrade" when compared to the ARB and the possible air leaks from 4 different seals.

It's interesting to note that selectable lockers are being offered on some of the new 4x4 trucks/Jeeps......ALL are elockers....none are air.

Merry Christmas.
ZUK

ps----A locker in the rear is the best bang for the buck....the whole steering system and CV axles will not appreciate a front locker.





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Old 12-10-2017, 09:09 PM   #16
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Thank you guys again. Iíve been studying and have a couple of different questions.

Ultimately i will have the harrop e locker in the rear and plan to stick with IFS in the front.

For now I do not want to spend $1300+ on 4wd capability when I wonít use it that much...this last year we have spent close to 10,000 on the truck somewhat restoring it.
Now onto my question(s)..

How does the aussie locker work vs a limited slip or Detroit tru trac for the front ?
Iím only asking because I read that tru track is made by Eaton who I trust to be a good differential manufacturer.
I do plan on putting new CV axles on the truck after front and rear wheel bearings but am hoping to be able to use stock replacements. Again, the truck wonít have over 31 inch tall BFG all terrains.

Do I understand correctly that either the Aussie, tru trac or any limited slip type diff in the front would be a little easier on CV axles and tie rods due to it automatically unlocking off road even when hubs are turned to lock and transfer case is in 4WD?

Thank you and sorry for my naivety,

Donnie
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:44 AM   #17
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The Harrop does not need an air compressor and the ARB absolutely does ... the possible air leaks from 4 different seals.
...the whole steering system and CV axles will not appreciate a front locker.
Thanks for this discussion, guys!
Lockers in front will be transparent on road but, I like Zuk's point^^^ because it favors reliability. An ARB compressor would also serve other purposes on the truck but electrical control would be cleaner to run.
So is the Harrop plug-and play into the first gen IFS4Runer?
Also wondering... Doesn't Toyota have OEM e-lockers for first-gen IFS 4Runners?
Merry Christmas to you too!
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Old 12-11-2017, 09:53 AM   #18
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This is a question you need to dig through yourself, as it is very opinionated. Some of your facts are off. Not going to restate as theyíre mentioned throughout this thread. You seem to be going back and forth. ďI wanna save money/iím gonna swap carrier/money is not a big deal. Research each product, install procedure, and maintenance (clutch packs). Good luck. Curious to know what you pick so post back.
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Old 12-11-2017, 10:58 AM   #19
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I am one of those people who likes to just do it once and do it right,


....

It's just one of those things where I don't know if I'll ever really need the extra $500 worth of capability of the air or E type lockers as a opposed to the capability/driveability of the aussie type lockers. If it's really only $1000 more to go full air/ E lockers front and rear

Any opinions are much appreciated.
you sort of contradict yourself here - IMO the right thing to do is go selectable if you can afford it. I should have done it right with the thirds from my 81 and gone selectable years ago. Now those thirds are living in my 94 and I am looking at spending more $$$ getting selectable lockers in the future

compressor costs can add signaficantly to your build cost
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Old 12-11-2017, 09:56 PM   #20
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Yes, you guys are correct. I was on the fence and not sure which way to go.

I am close to positive that Iím going to use an auto locker for the front and e locker for the rear. It will be either Eaton or harrop for the rear depending on which has better reviews. The rear will be 2-3 months down the road from now.

The front im just very undecided. I really want to stick with the front 7.5 IFS setup. Is there even an electric locker available for the 7.5 ifs stock housing?

If there is an electric full locking front diff for the stock 7.5 then Iíll go full lock front and rear. If not, Im going to research between Aussie, spartan and Detroit true track for the front. It seems like a lot to have an e locker in the rear and an air locker in the front just so I can keep the stock 7.5.
From my research it seems that with a selectable rear locker and auto front it will do 95% + off road that a front and rear full selectable will do...the drawback seems to be on-road manners of the front auto locker when locked on-road. This shouldnít be an issue often with me not living in snow country below 500 ft elevation. Iíll just lock in rear for a little extra and hop out and lock in fronts if I really ever need it or am off road.
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