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1993 DLX Restoration Project: Some Questions and plans

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1993 DLX Restoration Project: Some Questions and plans

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Old 06-14-2018, 12:40 AM
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1993 DLX Restoration Project: Some Questions and plans

Hello everyone. First post here, but I've been lurking around the past month. I own a 1993 Toyota Pickup DLX. It's not in the best shape ever. Here's a list of what was wrong with it and what I've done thus far.

- Steering Damper was shot. Replaced.
- Inner and outer tie rods are in bad shape. Boots ripped or gone.
- Idler Arm was almost disconnected entirely. Had it replaced.
- Centerlink was loose. Had it replaced.
- Bad rear axle seal. Leaking oil into drum brakes.
- Steering wheel has about two inches of play. Perhaps the steering box?
- Body panels need replacement. Many deep scratches and dents.
- Right headlight assembly loose. It more or less points at the ground.
- Bad Water Pump. Had it replaced.
- Gouged belts, had it replaced.
- No A/C. It uses R-32, and it's out. You can't buy it here legally. So, I have to get it converted to R-134a.
- No heater. Heater core is likely shot.

Truck is in rough shape. The previous owner obviously never took proper care of the vehicle. Now that I own it, it's under excellent care. I plan on putting down a lot of money to restore the truck to as new as I can get it. Right now, my first concern is performance. I want the truck to be more responsive when I press down on the gas pedal. So, would a better throttle body help with this? (I have basic automotive knowledge.) I'm also planning to get a cold air intake, new quality spark plugs, perhaps better injectors...

So far, here are my questions:

I. I am going to convert the rear brakes to disc, but my question is, are there dual caliper adapter brackets for this vehicle? Or is it universal for most vehicles?
II. I want to optimize the suspension for ride comfort. What shocks and springs should I look for this?
III. I want to keep the original block for the engine, have it cleaned and such. But I also want to get some more performance out of this engine. I realize this isn't an engine built for speed, but rather, built for extreme durability. Where could I get parts that would increase the performance of this engine while still adhering to smog laws? Which ones will have the most effect? Camshafts? Pistons? Fuel Injectors?


As far as money is concerned, it isn't. I am more than willing to save up and I have the patience. I am currently in the process of repairing anything that needs replacing on the vehicle. Afterwards, it's time to make the truck unique. I appreciate any help/advice you can offer me.

Thanks.
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Old 06-14-2018, 03:24 AM
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LCE and 22RE Performace sell big bore throttle bodies. I have one on my 4Runner thanks to the previous owner. I also have a 100% bone stock Pickup. The Pickup is faster. I would say there is no point in spending the $400 for a big bore throttle body. There is no better cold air intake than what the truck rolled off the assembly line with. In fact, almost any "cold air intake" you buy is actually a hot air intake. Stock is best. Best quality spark plugs are the factory Densos. You can buy Iridium ones. I did once. I noticed no difference and they didn't last long. But they did cost 4x as much. No point in better injectors. Good clean factory ones work. Get yours rebuilt or trade yours in for rebuilt ones at 22RE Performance. There is a brand of injectors commonly referenced on this site. There are as many problem reports as there are success stories. I've never tried them myself, but I see no reason why I would want to. Best bang for your buck is to just get the truck running right. Tune it up and make sure all sensors are working correctly and all connections are sound. Take care of any vacuum leaks. Use good sensors, OEM if possible. Make sure timing, TPS, and valve are all adjusted to spec. This stuff is easy and can be free. You can build a performance engine, but it will cost thousands of dollars and still won't be fast. Maybe fast for a 22RE, but still not fast.

I. Rear drums work fine and can last 150,000 miles or more. New hardware, shoes, and a proper adjustment will last you a long time. I don't recommend swapping to disks because you might have to deal with proportioning valves that aren't calibrated right, brake pedal dropping on the first application every time because the axles move in and out slightly and can separate the pads from the rotor, and lack of a parking brake. But that's just my opinion. Disk brakes are better in most cases, but only when properly engineered. A lot of the kits out there just give you enough to bolt a caliper up. There's a bit more to it than that. What do you mean dual caliper brackets? Don't think there has ever been a universal disk brake adapter made ever.

II. I really liked the Rancho RS5000's that came on my 4Runner. Stock front end, stock rear springs, and add-a-leafs rode really nice. I now have OME rear springs and OME shocks all around. A bit stiffer but still nice. Much nicer than anything running on sagged out rear springs which just sit on the overload leafs. You have the next generation Pickup compared to my Pickup and 4Runner. Not sure how the rear springs held up on those. If they aren't sagged out and sitting on the overloads they are probably fine.

III. 22RE Performance and LCE are the two best names in building these engines. Neither is cheap. Most gains are usually from head work, valves, and cam as a system. Pistons won't do anything unless you get high compression pistons. Fuel injectors do not add power. They add power capacity. You can't just magically add more fuel and make more power, you just make it run richer. You need to add more air (and add proportionally more fuel to keep the mixture correct) to make more power. So that's where the head work, valves, and cam come in.

Not trying to discourage you. Just trying to point out that a lot of the aftermarket stuff is no better than the stock parts they replace. You're really better off getting the vehicle back to stock and back to working correctly before trying to modify it.
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Old 06-14-2018, 03:26 AM
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LCE and 22RE Performace sell big bore throttle bodies. I have one on my 4Runner thanks to the previous owner. I also have a 100% bone stock Pickup. The Pickup is faster. I would say there is no point in spending the $400 for a big bore throttle body. There is no better cold air intake than what the truck rolled off the assembly line with. In fact, almost any "cold air intake" you buy is actually a hot air intake. Stock is best. Best quality spark plugs are the factory Densos. You can buy Iridium ones. I did once. I noticed no difference and they didn't last long. But they did cost 4x as much. No point in better injectors. Good clean factory ones work. Get yours rebuilt or trade yours in for rebuilt ones at 22RE Performance. There is a brand of injectors commonly referenced on this site. There are as many problem reports as there are success stories. I've never tried them myself, but I see no reason why I would want to. Best bang for your buck is to just get the truck running right. Tune it up and make sure all sensors are working correctly and all connections are sound. Take care of any vacuum leaks. Use good sensors, OEM if possible. Make sure timing, TPS, and valve are all adjusted to spec. This stuff is easy and can be free. You can build a performance engine, but it will cost thousands of dollars and still won't be fast. Maybe fast for a 22RE, but still not fast.

I. Rear drums work fine and can last 150,000 miles or more. New hardware, shoes, and a proper adjustment will last you a long time. I don't recommend swapping to disks because you might have to deal with proportioning valves that aren't calibrated right, brake pedal dropping on the first application every time because the axles move in and out slightly and can separate the pads from the rotor, and lack of a parking brake. But that's just my opinion. Disk brakes are better in most cases, but only when properly engineered. A lot of the kits out there just give you enough to bolt a caliper up. There's a bit more to it than that. What do you mean dual caliper brackets? Don't think there has ever been a universal disk brake adapter made ever.

II. I really liked the Rancho RS5000's that came on my 4Runner. Stock front end, stock rear springs, and add-a-leafs rode really nice. I now have OME rear springs and OME shocks all around. A bit stiffer but still nice. Much nicer than anything running on sagged out rear springs which just sit on the overload leafs. You have the next generation Pickup compared to my Pickup and 4Runner. Not sure how the rear springs held up on those. If they aren't sagged out and sitting on the overloads they are probably fine.

III. 22RE Performance and LCE are the two best names in building these engines. Neither is cheap. Most gains are usually from head work, valves, and cam as a system. Pistons won't do anything unless you get high compression pistons. Fuel injectors do not add power. They add power capacity. You can't just magically add more fuel and make more power, you just make it run richer. You need to add more air (and add proportionally more fuel to keep the mixture correct) to make more power. So that's where the head work, valves, and cam come in.

Not trying to discourage you. Just trying to point out that a lot of the aftermarket stuff is no better than the stock parts they replace. You're really better off getting the vehicle back to stock and back to working correctly before trying to modify it.
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Old 06-14-2018, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by arlindsay1992 View Post
LCE and 22RE Performace sell big bore throttle bodies. I have one on my 4Runner thanks to the previous owner. I also have a 100% bone stock Pickup. The Pickup is faster. I would say there is no point in spending the $400 for a big bore throttle body. There is no better cold air intake than what the truck rolled off the assembly line with. In fact, almost any "cold air intake" you buy is actually a hot air intake. Stock is best. Best quality spark plugs are the factory Densos. You can buy Iridium ones. I did once. I noticed no difference and they didn't last long. But they did cost 4x as much. No point in better injectors. Good clean factory ones work. Get yours rebuilt or trade yours in for rebuilt ones at 22RE Performance. There is a brand of injectors commonly referenced on this site. There are as many problem reports as there are success stories. I've never tried them myself, but I see no reason why I would want to. Best bang for your buck is to just get the truck running right. Tune it up and make sure all sensors are working correctly and all connections are sound. Take care of any vacuum leaks. Use good sensors, OEM if possible. Make sure timing, TPS, and valve are all adjusted to spec. This stuff is easy and can be free. You can build a performance engine, but it will cost thousands of dollars and still won't be fast. Maybe fast for a 22RE, but still not fast.

I. Rear drums work fine and can last 150,000 miles or more. New hardware, shoes, and a proper adjustment will last you a long time. I don't recommend swapping to disks because you might have to deal with proportioning valves that aren't calibrated right, brake pedal dropping on the first application every time because the axles move in and out slightly and can separate the pads from the rotor, and lack of a parking brake. But that's just my opinion. Disk brakes are better in most cases, but only when properly engineered. A lot of the kits out there just give you enough to bolt a caliper up. There's a bit more to it than that. What do you mean dual caliper brackets? Don't think there has ever been a universal disk brake adapter made ever.

II. I really liked the Rancho RS5000's that came on my 4Runner. Stock front end, stock rear springs, and add-a-leafs rode really nice. I now have OME rear springs and OME shocks all around. A bit stiffer but still nice. Much nicer than anything running on sagged out rear springs which just sit on the overload leafs. You have the next generation Pickup compared to my Pickup and 4Runner. Not sure how the rear springs held up on those. If they aren't sagged out and sitting on the overloads they are probably fine.

III. 22RE Performance and LCE are the two best names in building these engines. Neither is cheap. Most gains are usually from head work, valves, and cam as a system. Pistons won't do anything unless you get high compression pistons. Fuel injectors do not add power. They add power capacity. You can't just magically add more fuel and make more power, you just make it run richer. You need to add more air (and add proportionally more fuel to keep the mixture correct) to make more power. So that's where the head work, valves, and cam come in.

Not trying to discourage you. Just trying to point out that a lot of the aftermarket stuff is no better than the stock parts they replace. You're really better off getting the vehicle back to stock and back to working correctly before trying to modify it.
^^ I could not agree more with arlindsay1992. He has basically said everything I wanted to say!

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Old 06-14-2018, 01:00 PM
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I could not agree more with arlindsay1992 and old87yota.


I also thought rear drum brakes are no good and would be a pain to maintain so wanted to convert as well, but I was wrong. Rear brakes only contribute to small percentage of braking power, and components are not very difficult nor expensive to replace, maybe every 150k miles or so... (I used NON-Premium NAPA shoes and cylinders and am happy with them). Converting to disc brakes would be too much trouble and cost for what it's worth. Your money and time would be better spent on other things. IF, and only IF, your truck has already been restored to pristine, reliable condition and you itch to have something to do with it, go ahead, convert your rear brakes.

Additional Parts Sources:
  • Toyotapartsdeal.com - OEM parts for less
  • RockAuto - oem or not - pretty popular among us here.
  • Marlin Crawler - performance and standard replacement parts. I bought my rear wheel bearing replacement kit (OEM bearing!) from MC. Great pricing.
  • Local NAPA - Pretty happy with brake parts and V-belts I bought there.
  • Summit Racing - performance or standard replacement
Before you do anything to your truck, research and search this forum. There are many people knowledgeable on the 2nd gens and earlier who, unlike STEALERSHIPS, have no interest in coming between you and your wallet. In fact, recently Arlindsay and many others shared info to replace both my rear wheel bearings in a clean and efficient manner for less than $200, when it would have cost $1400 at the stealership.

Us the "Google" search function for best and most relevant results the other search function suck.
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Last edited by RAD4Runner; 06-14-2018 at 01:12 PM.
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Old 06-14-2018, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by arlindsay1992 View Post
LCE and 22RE Performace sell big bore throttle bodies. I have one on my 4Runner thanks to the previous owner. I also have a 100% bone stock Pickup. The Pickup is faster. I would say there is no point in spending the $400 for a big bore throttle body. There is no better cold air intake than what the truck rolled off the assembly line with. In fact, almost any "cold air intake" you buy is actually a hot air intake.
I agree with most of what you wrote but a couple not-so-much.

I would expect any pickup to be faster than any similarly equipped 4Runner. But that isn’t really an apples to apples comparison. Comparing curb weights (via quick web search):
Apples – 1984–1988 Pickup 2,800 lb
to
1984–1988 4Runner 3,800 lb Watermelons?
This also doesn’t account for gearing.

Also, a cold air kit is dependent on where it takes the air from. As suggested if taken from the engine side of the radiator it is taking in heated air. If taken from ahead of the radiator core support it is likely cooler and less obstructed.
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Old 06-15-2018, 03:46 AM
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Never seen anything available for these trucks off the shelf that pulls air from in front of the radiator except what they came with stock.

I see your point with the weights. But even with the 4Runner's top removed, the Pickup is faster. Both are 4WD, same engine, same trans, same rear end ratios. Sure there are some differences, but my point is that if I paid for the big bore throttle body, I'd be pretty upset because it didn't make any appreciable difference.
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Old 06-15-2018, 11:15 AM
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Re Cold Air Intake

I've always wanted to do swap intake and battery like 4Crawler's Phase I swap because I want a cleaner engine bay primarily, to keep intake away from the radiator inlet hose (here), and to shorten intake path. This makes intake similar to today's Tacoma's and 4runners, getting air from above the wheel-well.
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Old 06-15-2018, 04:15 PM
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Originally Posted by arlindsay1992 View Post
Never seen anything available for these trucks off the shelf that pulls air from in front of the radiator except what they came with stock.
Probably so, most off the shelf stuff is more for show vs go. But with a bit of effort a person can make something that will flow a higher volume of cooler air. Which is what IC engines want since they are essntially air pumps.

Originally Posted by RAD4Runner View Post
I've always wanted to do swap intake and battery like 4Crawler's Phase I swap because I want a cleaner engine bay primarily, to keep intake away from the radiator inlet hose (here), and to shorten intake path. This makes intake similar to today's Tacoma's and 4runners, getting air from above the wheel-well.
This is the kind of thing I like - taking something that the factory made for X vehicle, establishing that it will make a notable improvement if adapted to X vehicle, and doing it.
Is it done yet RAD?
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Old 06-15-2018, 05:05 PM
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It would make since functionally if you had to move the intake for a dual battery setup, but....

I am still not convinced a cold air intake (either the real or "ricer" versions) is really going to make a significant, positive difference to an otherwise stock 22R-E. I know engines like colder, denser air but would it really be that significant? I would have thought Toyota would have designed the intake differently if they thought so.......

"The box said 10+ horsepower!"



Anyway, we are derailing this thread so we should start a separate thread if we want to continue the conversation.

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