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Small first aid kit for mountain biking

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Old 08-26-2009, 12:28 PM   #1
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Small first aid kit for mountain biking

I have several first aid kits, I keep four in the rig at all times.
One is an old REI backpacking one, one home made in a Tupperware container, and two from Boeing that are small ones.

However the latter ones are to big to carry in my Camelbak Lobo hydration pack.

I need a simple small one, and looking at REIs page they have a nice small one for $10 that includes blunt nose scissors.
I have a pair that is around forty years old that was my parents that I keep in the Tupperware kit I put together years ago.

Here is the REI page.

The small kit that would fit my pack is this one, does it look OK, or could I do better?
http://www.rei.com/product/753285



You have to click the image on their site to see the contents.
The reviews for it look good, and it has room I can add more bandages to it.
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Old 08-26-2009, 04:52 PM   #2
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Most of the injuries sustained while biking....
Cracked rib
Busted collarbone 2 different times
concussion(s)
knocked out
laceration needing 80 stitches
multiple cuts, scrapes, bruises sometimes covering an entire arm or leg
rocks under skin
sticks in skin
stung by wasps

So....I don't carry a kit but this is what I'd throw in one ('cept the bee and pi stuff since no allergies) if I were to be so inclined.

Something small and precise to pick the foreign objects out
Something to close/maybe cover gaping wounds
Something to steady a broken or twisted something
Something to wipe off the poison ivy you just crashed into if you are allergic to it
Something for if you're allergic to bees, wasps, etc
If you get a signal a phone, a buddy or at least,
Someone who knows where you're at and when you'll be back


And if you wanna go all out and going pretty far or remote something to keep you warm, something to keep you dry and something to eat in case you've got to spend a night outside.

That's all I can think of right now.
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Old 08-26-2009, 06:40 PM   #3
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I used to carry some steri strips in my small bike seat bag and some medical tape to hold the cut closed until I got home also carried a few alcohol and iodine wipes.
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Old 08-28-2009, 09:10 PM   #4
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Hab is right about the common injuries.
When I recommend a kit to somebody, I always tell them - only pack/bring what you know how to use.

You really just need BLS material if not less.
Bleeding, fractures, dehydration, pain suppression, allergic reaction medication, snake/insect bite treatment, etc...

I'd go with the Hunter kit from Adventure Medical Kits.
They make amazing products and they're bag/cases are top notch and about 99% waterproof/resistant.

If you wanted something cheaper/slightly smaller you could go with the Sportsman kit from AMK.
It's the same as the Hunter except minus the Field Trauma Kit.

The Field Trauma Kit is something I recommend people carry with them at all times - just like it says, it could save your life.
Only thing I would add to it is extra medication/wipes, some surgical tape and some shears.

In all honesty, the brands aren't a big deal...at all.
Most of the time they all use the same brands of components (i.e., same brands of the bandages, dressings, etc...).
The only reason I promote AMK so much is I have used their kits and love them.
They seem to have real-life experience that lets them get very concise lists of what you need for a specific scenario.

I've got a huge BLS (Basic Life Support) kit that I carry that has everything from a fingertip bandage to a bag-valve mask for CPR.

Studies have shown that bleeding is the number one cause of death in the field due to lengthened response times.
Given that, I would recommend carrying some sort of coagulant bandage, powder, etc...

I'd, again, recommend AMK's QuickClot.
It's as simple as putting a clean cloth on your wound except this one will stop bleeding within minutes.

Only downside is the ER doc is going to hate you, they'll just have to clean the wound that much more but it could save your life.

Don't over-think it, get what you know how to use and leave the other stuff to the pro's.

What I'd put more thought into is how you are going to call for help if you end up in the middle of nowhere.
ALWAYS know where you are and what your main injury/condition is - don't give them too much information or it will get lost in transit.
We don't need to know you had knee surgery 5 years ago or that your mother died of congestive heart failure.

The number one thing that delays Police/Fire/EMS response times is location.
Stay calm, slow your breathing and just sit there for a second and get your wits about you.
Calling, being hysterical, yelling and crying is not going to help anybody.

If you have a hand-held GPS keep track of your coordinates, we can use that to find you if you don't have any better information.

One of these days maybe I'll get that first aid kit article done.

Fink

Last edited by Fink; 08-28-2009 at 09:14 PM.
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Old 08-29-2009, 05:29 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4x4Fink View Post
Hab is right about the common injuries.
Ha! Those are some of my injuries! You have to go get your own!

I would have thought exposure or dehydration would be the leading causes, but I could see bleeding to death due to response time. I always figured I'd end up using my spare tube as a tourniquet.....
.....so if you hear of some bloody dead chick found out in the woods with an inner tube wrapped around her neck fairly close to her mountain bike you'll know what happened.


I'll have to look into that QuickClot, very interesting and prolly not much to carry in the camelback, either. Lucky today doesn't mean lucky tomorrow.



It's best if you can ride with a buddy if it's not a busy trail. If not, let people know where you are going and about when you'll be back. Trails are often too remote for your cell phone, but if you've got one carry it with you in a ziploc or something waterproof.
As for information. Write the basics down-name, addy, contacts, allergies, medical conditions and stuff that in your camelback in something waterproof. From experience I can tell you- you won't always be awake when help arrives.

Last edited by habanero; 08-29-2009 at 05:38 AM.
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Old 08-29-2009, 06:11 AM   #6
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Thanks for the info Fink.
I went and ordered though that small $10 REI kit, and it arrived Friday.

The kits you listed are to big to mountain bike with pretty much, they are approaching the big size I already carry in my FJ for off roading and camping.
What I need is just a small one one to carry in my 100 oz. hydration pack I just picked up, and weight is crucial when biking.

Up where I will be doing most of my mountain biking out of the city is also up where I camped last week, and have often 4wheeled my vehicles.
There is no cell phone coverage up there at all, so perhaps the best thing to do for communication is to buy a Spot tracking unit.
http://www.findmespot.com/en/
You have to pay for a subscription to use it though yearly.

Or, one could spend $1,500 on a sat phone

But the Spot unit will bring rescuers to you if you push the panic button if you are so banged up from biking that you can not move.
I am seriously thinking of getting the Spot.
It can also be used to track your progress online and people can view that on a website.

This little kit I just got has extra room in it to pack more bandages and drugs.
It slides right into my hydration pack behind where my wallet will go.

Good tips too Hab on writing down the info to carry with you.
I saw this in Bike magazine last night.
http://roadid.com/Common/default.aspx
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Old 08-29-2009, 06:13 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habanero View Post
Ha! Those are some of my injuries! You have to go get your own!

I would have thought exposure or dehydration would be the leading causes, but I could see bleeding to death due to response time. I always figured I'd end up using my spare tube as a tourniquet.....
.....so if you hear of some bloody dead chick found out in the woods with an inner tube wrapped around her neck fairly close to her mountain bike you'll know what happened.


I'll have to look into that QuickClot, very interesting and prolly not much to carry in the camelback, either. Lucky today doesn't mean lucky tomorrow.



It's best if you can ride with a buddy if it's not a busy trail. If not, let people know where you are going and about when you'll be back. Trails are often too remote for your cell phone, but if you've got one carry it with you in a ziploc or something waterproof.
As for information. Write the basics down-name, addy, contacts, allergies, medical conditions and stuff that in your camelback in something waterproof. From experience I can tell you- you won't always be awake when help arrives.
As for the injuries, I've had my fair share but the ones you sustained are just about the common everyday hiker/biker injuries.

I should clarify that bleeding out is the most common cause of death in most cases in the wilderness.
Depending on the climate, location, altitude, animals, environment the causes could be anything from insects to hypothermia.

As far as writing stuff down, absolutely write that stuff down.
Index cards are great for that - name, DOB, height, weight, blood type if you know it, medicines you take regularly, medicinal allergies, environmental allergies, medical history, next of kin/emergency contact, address.

Great idea hab.

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Old 08-29-2009, 06:16 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey View Post
Thanks for the info Fink.
I went and ordered though that small $10 REI kit, and it arrived Friday.

The kits you listed are to big to mountain bike with pretty much, they are approaching the big size I already carry in my FJ for off roading and camping.
What I need is just a small one one to carry in my 100 oz. hydration pack I just picked up, and weight is crucial when biking.

Up where I will be doing most of my mountain biking out of the city is also up where I camped last week, and have often 4wheeled my vehicles.
There is no cell phone coverage up there at all, so perhaps the best thing to do for communication is to buy a Spot tracking unit.
http://www.findmespot.com/en/
You have to pay for a subscription to use it though yearly.

Or, one could spend $1,500 on a sat phone

But the Spot unit will bring rescuers to you if you push the panic button if you are so banged up from biking that you can not move.
I am seriously thinking of getting the Spot.
It can also be used to track your progress online and people can view that on a website.

This little kit I just got has extra room in it to pack more bandages and drugs.
It slides right into my hydration pack behind where my wallet will go.

Good tips too Hab on writing down the info to carry with you.
I saw this in Bike magazine last night.
http://roadid.com/Common/default.aspx
Yeah, some of those packs can get pretty big but that is why I highly recommend the Hunter kit.
It is ideal for a camping trip where you plan on hitting some trails on your bike, ATV or just hiking.
With the detachable Field Trauma Kit you can pop that out, throw it in your pack and head on your way leaving the main kit behind at camp.

Those Spot things are very cool, never had any experience here with them but have read about them in magazines.

A satellite phone would be just plain awesome though.

Fink
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Old 08-29-2009, 06:50 AM   #9
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Yes, sat phones are nice, but the expense to buy one and the service provider is a lotta dough.

I will be researching the Spot thing in more detail today, and by the end of the day I may have one on order.
Satellite reliant equipment works up there where I was on my trip, as both my indash nav system worked, and I also had Sirius radio reception.
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Old 10-12-2011, 03:48 AM   #10
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That looks ok but make sure you get some butterfly bandages they work great as a temporary stich for closing deep wounds that require stiches unless you cam hand sticjong your self then add a neddle thread and necessasary antibacterial ointmants and saleen to clean the wound first
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Old 10-12-2011, 03:51 AM   #11
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you should also try bringing the surgical glue it works better than stiches you should be able to get it at a medical supply store
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Old 10-17-2014, 05:40 PM   #12
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This is an old post but thought I'd chime in.

Really all I carry in my camelback (actually a knock of with issued bladder) is an Israeli bandage and CAT tourniquet. I always have a knife and most place I've ridden aren't too remote. I'd like to say I always ride with a partner but I don't like to lie. Of course I usually pack extra water and a snack plus a little repair kit.
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